Yearly Archives: 2018


#ThrowbackThursday: First Sitting of the Supreme Court of Canada

Way back on January 17, 1876, six judges assembled on Parliament Hill for their first sitting of the Supreme Court of Canada! They had just finished drafting their rules of procedure in mid-January, but the only problem? There were no cases to be heard! Transcripts from this first session of the Supreme Court state “There being no business to dispose of, the Court rose.”

The court heard its first case in April 1876, and after that, it sat for a week in June. (Give me this work sched any day!)

It spent its first five years in vacant rooms in the Parliament buildings, before moving to a more permanent building on the West Block in 1882.

 

Old Supreme Court of Canada Building, West Block

Old Supreme Court of Canada Building, West Block. Credit: Library and Archives Canada/PA-052668

 

Interior of the old Supreme Court of Canada.

Interior of the old Supreme Court of Canada. Credit: Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-027194

References / Further Reading


New Database Subscription: ICLR

We may have limited physical space available at the moment, but to somewhat make up for it we’re happy to announce we’ve added a subscription to the UK Case Law Reporter database ICLR! If you’ve ever used a British case you’ve probably gotten it from an ICLR publication, so we’re very excited to still be able to still access that collection while we are renovating.

We love the clean interface of the program, and its searching and navigation are intuitive and easy to use. Stay tuned as we explore and demonstrate some of its features over the coming months!

You can access the ICLR on site at the CCLA Library, through our lawyer computers. Friendly reminder that all our databases can be accessed through the Library Toolkit icon on each desktop!


Online Research Training Options

As we’re unable to host any training sessions in the Library for the next while, we wanted to direct you to some online legal research training options. We’ll be holding online sessions of our own over the year (dates will continue to be added), but these are some options available for you to do from your own office right now:

For WestlawNext Canada / Thomson Reuters ProView …

Canada Professional Development Centre

Thomson Retuers continually offers webinars on their online products, such as Westlaw and ProView, that are both free and CPD accredited.

Interactive eLearning Experiences

These modules (listed in blue towards the top of this page) will give a simulated learning experience for Thomson products.

WestlawNext Canada Self-Paced Learning

Find out more about specific features of WestlawNext with these short videos and PDF files.

For Lexis Advance Quicklaw…

Webinars

Sign up for a free webinar on Lexis Advance Quicklaw from the selection available in their online calendar.

Self-Study Modules

Browse this list of quick YouTube videos for using the Advance platform.

For JustisOne…

Training Webinar

This quick video will show you the basics of this British database.

User Guide

Follow this link if you would prefer a PDF user guide.

For HeinOnline...

Training Videos

These YouTube videos can teach you basics of searching through HeinOnline.

Training Guides

If you’d rather text-based instruction, there are a series here covering many different aspects of the Hein database.

*Note: Law Society of Ontario licensees have access to HeinOnline from the own computers! Click here to learn how to set up access.

For CanLII…

CCLA Webinar – Thursday, February 22, 2018

We’ll be leading this webinar that looks at everyone’s favourite free resource, CanLII. There is a small charge for this session.


Ottawa Blog Roll: December 2017

Huge congratulations to Sean Bawden and Woods LaFortune LLP for carrying the Ottawa torch as Clawbie Winners this year! Well deserved!!

Please find below links to blog posts or articles authored by the Ottawa legal community in December.

Civil Litigation

Adjudication coming to a construction project near you – lessons learned from the english experience
– Louis-Pierre Grégoire & Patrick Lavoie, Gowling WLG

Appeal Court orders rehearing on coverage for workplace accident
– Stephanie Doucet, Gowling WLG

Employer vs. Employee – Who Was Telling the Truth in Workers’ Compensation Claim?
– Frank Van Dyke, Van Dyke Injury Law Blog

CPP Benefit Claims – Does Choosing Your Own Doctor Affect Your Success?
– Frank Van Dyke, Van Dyke Injury Law Blog

Condominium Law

Information Certificate Updates
– Rodrigue Escayola, Condo Adviser

A Condo Year in Review – Our Top 10 Most Popular Posts of 2017
– Jocelyn Duquette, Condo Adviser

AGM Notice Calculator
– Rodrigue Escayola, Condo Adviser

Things to watch for in 2018
– James Davidson, Davidson Houle Allen LLP

Corporate Commercial Law

“Summary Judgment and Evidence of ‘Material Change’ – Hepburn v AlarmForce”
– Merovitz Potechin LLP

Criminal Law

December 2017 Criminal Law Round-Up
– Anne Marie McElroy, McElroy Law

Top Criminal Cases Of 2017
– Anne Marie McElroy, McElroy Law

Digital Evidence: A Book Review
– Anne Marie McElroy, McElroy Law

Let’s Talk About Mental Health
– Michael Spratt, Abergel Goldstein & Partners LLP

Employment & Labour Law

$750,000 in moral and punitive damages awarded to employee left to “twist in the wind”
– Andrew Vey, Vey Willetts LLP

Higher wages, more vacation, more protected leave – what’s not to like?
– Colleen Hoey, Mann Lawyers

The Legality of Taking Away Paid Breaks and Benefits
– Sean Bawden, Labour Pains

Top Five Cases of Importance to Ontario Employment Law – 2017 Edition
– Sean Bawden, Labour Pains

Workers Now Eligible for WSIB Benefits for Chronic Mental Stress and Workplace Harassment
– Sean Bawden, Labour Pains

Continue Reading…


Recently Published Ottawa Decisions

Find below recently published Ottawa decisions, available for free through CanLII.org.

Family Matters

M.D. v. A.C. (2017 ONSC 7722)
offer to settle — costs — validity of the marriage contract — fix — amount
Justice T. Engelking

Maan v. Poirier (2017 ONSC 7678)
contempt — support — parenting course — access — three-part test
Justice D. Summers

Fortier v. Lauzon (2017 ONSC 7503)
father — equalization payment — interest in the matrimonial home — pension —
occupation rent
Justice M. Shelston

Zakhour v. Nayel (2017 ONSC 7601)
occupation rent — matrimonial home — spousal support — separation — provide
Justice T. Engelking

Gagnon v. Vance (2017 ONSC 7575)
email — set aside — office — potential prejudice — uncontested
Justice D. Summers

Sarmiento v. Ortiz (2017 ONSC 7570)
income — child support — payor parent — retroactive — pay
Justice T. Engelking

Hallock v. Wakely (2017 ONSC 7347)
children — access — parenting — grandparents — text messages
Justice C. MacLeod

Continue Reading…


#ThrowbackThursday: Then and Now, Part 2

Back in 2016 I posted this Throwback Thursday, which gave a view of the stacks in our Law Reports section as they were at the time and in 1986. As you know, we’re getting ready to renovate, so here’s part two of this particular Then and Now:

Then (December 2017)

 

Now (January 2018)

 

We took a whole bunch of photos on the last day of the library looking “normal” – once renovations are done, we’ll be able to do a whole series of cool before and after shots. This section of the CCLA’s space is the first that will be renovated (and should be starting soon!).


‘Charterpedia’ Launched by Department of Justice

If you were paying attention on twitter and/or were very on the ball a couple weeks ago, you may have noticed that the Department of Justice launched a new online service called the Charterpedia, and it is really great! This new resource provides summaries and note ups on every Charter section, and it is now available free of charge to everyone!

As per its own description:

This Charterpedia provides legal information about the Charter and contains information about the purpose of each section of the Charter, the analysis or test developed through case law in respect of the section, and any particular considerations related to it. Each Charterpedia entry cites relevant case law, and citations to Supreme Court of Canada decisions are hyperlinked whenever possible.

Check it out!


CCLA Renovations: Library Service Update

After a grueling month of moving books, packing, unpacking, furniture disassembly and reassembly, we’re back! Here’s an update on what is currently available at the CCLA Library:

Public Computers

There are three computers available for use. You can print from these computers (black and white only). All of these computers are set up to access WestlawNext Canada, Lexis Advance Quicklaw, Thomson Reuters ProView, and a whole bunch of other great research tools.

Print Collection

All of the books that we chose to keep out during the renovation are now in the Lounge. You can call this collection our Greatest Hits. As always, books are for Courthouse use only – if you wish to take a book to court, please see a CCLA Library staff member to sign the book out. Books are due back to a staff member by 5:00 every day.

Photocopiers and Fax

We have one photocopier available for copying and scanning, and one fax machine. For payment for copies or print jobs, we accept cheques, cards, or firm account only (no cash).

Library Staff Assistance

We’re here! We’ve propped open the doors between the Lounge and the Library (we’ll be taking them down entirely soon), and you can find us just past those doors. We’ve also re-opened the helplines, so free free to call or email. During this time, we can order in books from other libraries if we don’t have what you need, but if you’re reading this from a library we normally lend to, we’re sorry but we can’t lend anything at this time.

Workspace

We’re a bit short on space at the moment for studying. There are a few tables in the lounge, but nothing available in the Library itself. This is a temporary measure and we’ll have more space available later this year.

One other big change is that the old “main doors” to the library are no longer in service. They’ll be back in the future, but for now they will remain locked. The only entrance to the Library is through the lounge, and while we acknowledge this does make it more difficult to find us, and harder to get in if you do not have a code, this is only a temporary measure. We will be open again through the main entrance later this year. Contact us if you need the code for the lounge.

We thank every one for their patience over the last month – we know how difficult it can be to carry on business at court without the services the CCLA provides.