#TBT


#ThrowbackThursday: Civil Litigation Updated 1987

Our last cornerstone conference of the year kicks off tomorrow, so this means our last throwback in 2017 to the conferences from years past. For this year’s “Mont Ste. Trembello” (Mont Ste. Marie + Tremblant + Montebello), I’ve pulled up the agenda from 1987. As a special treat, we also have a copy of the registration form (a nerdy attention to detail that maybe only I enjoy, but I’ve included for you regardless).

 


#ThrowbackThursday: Happy Birthday, CBC! 2

I can’t be the only person who sees reference to an old piece of legislation and then wants to look it up for themselves. When I saw today’s date – November 2 – listed as parliament passing the Canadian Broadcasting Act, I immediately jumped over to HeinOnline to look at the statute from the source law. I was disappointed to see that this information was a bit misleading – The Canadian Broadcasting Act, 1936 was assented to in June 1936.

Page one of SC 1936 c. 24. (If you’d like a copy of the whole act, let us know!)

The CBC did, however, go live to air on November 2, 1936, replacing its predecessor the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission (which itself replaced CNR Radio). Two days after, on November 4, a formal welcome was given by CBC Chairman Leonard Brockington – you can listen to this 15 minute clip on the CBC Archives.

 


#ThrowbackThursday: CBC Archives “On This Day”

Today’s Throwback doesn’t directly have to do with law, but I just stumbled across this portion of the CBC website and definitely wanted to share it.

In the digital archives of the CBC, they’ve built an “On This Day” feature that allows you to watch a news clip from the top story of a day from some point in CBC’s broadcasting past. They’ve selected topic for each day of the year, with some incredibly varied new stories.

As today is September 28, their news story for the day dates from 2000 – “Pierre Trudeau Dies at 80.”


New on HeinOnline: Canadian Bar Review

HeinOnline has recently announced that the Canadian Bar Review, the journal of the CBA, has now been added to their database. Available issues date all the way back to volume 1 from 1923. As LSUC members, you have free access to HeinOnline, right from your desk. The password changes regularly, so get in touch with us here at the library if you need the most up-to-date version.

Since it is Thursday, here’s a Throwback to the intro to the first article in the first volume.  The title is “Law as a Link of Empire” and it’s authored by The Right Honourable Lord Shaw of Dunferline.

Just the first page – if you’d like a copy of the entire article, let us know!


#ThrowbackThursday: Daly and Nicholas, Past & Present

I found today’s entry on the Facebook page for Lost Ottawa. The SAW Video Media Arts Centre is located the building now known as the Arts Court. Of course, that building wasn’t always used for that purpose – many still remember it as the old courthouse. For a new video from SAW, historical and modern photos of the site are merged together to compare the  building as it once was and as it is today.  Click here to watch the full video (it’s only 2:48 long, and totally worth it!).

From the creator:

My video for Issue 9 uses historical photographs of the Arts Courts site and video of the present day site. Using the same vantage point in both the video and the photographs, the images are morphed together, allowing a comparison of the past and the present day view of the site. They reveal architectural changes and the passage of time flowing over these buildings as the surrounding city rises up around them.

This video uses historical photographs of the Arts Courts site and video of the present day site. The images are morphed together, allowing a comparison of the past and the present day view of the site.


#ThrowbackThursday: Library Renovations, 1895

I can’t help it – I’m officially obsessed with the goodies I’ve found looking through old scans of The Ottawa Journal. Our last TBT was about the 1940 golf tournament; today’s is even older.

We’ve been deep in the weeds here at the CCLA with renovation planning over the last few months. Finding this news clipping from the December 14, 1895 Ottawa Journal on what was surely the first CCLA “renovation” has totally made my day:

Pictures of this “model law library” are at the very, very top of my wish list (sadly, none exist that we know of). I’m also amused that there was concern even then about room for lawyers to meet with their clients – this has to be one of the most frequently requested things at our current day courthouse!

In happy news, the move out from judges’ chambers was in fact approved by the gaol and building committee:


#ThrowbackThursday: CCLA Golf Tournament, 1940

I was doing some digging on newspapers.com for old Ottawa stories, and came across this write-up about the 1940 CCLA golf tournament. Printed on June 27, 1940 in The Ottawa Journal, this seems to be going for humour, but I think maybe you had to be there (and perhaps know the people in question!).


#ThrowbackThursday: Statutes of Canada 1888

This week’s Throwback was scheduled to be something else, but I found this book while weeding the legislation section of the library yesterday and couldn’t resist.

Below, pictures from one of our volumes of the Statutes of Canada 1888, where someone (the librarian? A lawyer?) pasted legal stories from the newspaper into the first pages of the book. A nice time capsule item of how legal information was captured way-back-when.