#TBT


#ThrowbackThursday: Our Winter Olympics Appreciation Post

Readers, I hope you’ll forgive our non-legal related Throwback Thursday this week, as we head into the Winter Olympics. We simply can’t help ourselves around here: we love the Olympics. Winter or summer, it doesn’t matter. Brenda handled the summer Olympics a couple of years ago on the blog, and with the opening ceremonies tomorrow in Pyeongchang, I’m taking a look at the winter games today. Here are four big stories tied to today’s date from Canadian Winter Olympics history.

On this Day, 1948 (Ottawa Connection!): 70 years ago today was the closing of the 1948 Winter Olympics, held in St. Moritz, Switzerland. It was the first Winter Olympics held after WWII, and was where Ottawa figure skater Barbara Ann Scott won gold in the women’s competition. Two factoids on this skate: 1. The skating rink was outdoors (!), and during her skate a low-flying plane overhead (!!) caused some audio distraction; and 2: in 1948 there were no Zambonis, so she had to just skate around the chopped up ice from the hockey game the night before.

Here’s a video of her skate:

 

On This Day, 1998: On this day in 1998, Ross Rebagliati won the first ever gold in snowboarding at the Nagano Olympics. Now there’s your legal connection: remember everything that happened after that? You can find the Court of Arbitration for Sport decision on his case here.

 

On this day, 2002: 16 years ago today was the opening ceremonies of the Salt Lake City Games. Some of you may remember this as a games where both the Canadian Women’s and Men’s hockey teams won gold. There was one major news story, however, that dominated those games:

 

On this day, 2014: We’ll end on a happy note – the Dufour-Lapointe sisters! Who doesn’t love this story of the sisters winning Gold and Silver in the Ladies’ mogul event in Sochi?


#ThrowbackThursday: Demolition Before & After

The old library half of our space is in full on demolition mode right now, which is incredibly exciting and interesting for us to see! Every morning when we come in there is something new missing – the carpets, the ceiling, occasionally an entire wall!

I was flipping back through photos on my phone from December, and found a photo taken from the same angle as one I took today. Check out some of the demo work that’s been happening:

Before:

 

After:

Goodbye, old photocopy room!


#ThrowbackThursday: First Sitting of the Supreme Court of Canada 1

Way back on January 17, 1876, six judges assembled on Parliament Hill for their first sitting of the Supreme Court of Canada! They had just finished drafting their rules of procedure in mid-January, but the only problem? There were no cases to be heard! Transcripts from this first session of the Supreme Court state “There being no business to dispose of, the Court rose.”

The court heard its first case in April 1876, and after that, it sat for a week in June. (Give me this work sched any day!)

It spent its first five years in vacant rooms in the Parliament buildings, before moving to a more permanent building on the West Block in 1882.

 

Old Supreme Court of Canada Building, West Block

Old Supreme Court of Canada Building, West Block. Credit: Library and Archives Canada/PA-052668

 

Interior of the old Supreme Court of Canada.

Interior of the old Supreme Court of Canada. Credit: Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-027194

References / Further Reading


#ThrowbackThursday: Then and Now, Part 2

Back in 2016 I posted this Throwback Thursday, which gave a view of the stacks in our Law Reports section as they were at the time and in 1986. As you know, we’re getting ready to renovate, so here’s part two of this particular Then and Now:

Then (December 2017)

 

Now (January 2018)

 

We took a whole bunch of photos on the last day of the library looking “normal” – once renovations are done, we’ll be able to do a whole series of cool before and after shots. This section of the CCLA’s space is the first that will be renovated (and should be starting soon!).


#ThrowbackThursday: Rules of Practice, 1888 2

We’re right in the middle of moving / weeding / rearranging / packing the library collection, and one set of titles we just moved were our back editions of the Ontario Annual Practice. Before we moved them, our best guess was that we had them back to the 80s. The 1980s. We soon realized it was the 1880s. This item isn’t exactly rare (we have two copies!), but it is certainly cool to look at.


#ThrowbackThursday: CCLA Library, 1986 – 2017

It is incredibly hard for us to believe, but this is our last day of normal library service in the CCLA Library as we know it! Starting tomorrow, we’re closed down for the month of December so we can empty the space out and get ready for renovations to start in the new year. We’re going to take a whole load of photos of the library and lounge today, so that we have them to do some incredible before and after shots with later (and for posterity, of course!). I’m hopeful we’ll be able to show you some “In Progress” shots as well over the next year. Stay tuned!


#ThrowbackThursday: Quicksearch User’s Manual 2

Fellow fans of old tech, behold: a Quicksearch User’s Manual!

As we get ready to renovate the library, we’ve had to do a massive clean out of our belongings. Our ED Rick found this jewel tucked away in the depths of our storage locker.

Quicksearch was the precursor to Quicklaw. Undoubtedly some of you remember the early days of online searching for cases. No fancy interfaces here! Just DOS-like prompts over dial-up modems. This user’s manual was a looseleaf (last updated here in 1993), that showed you how to carry out the (by today’s standards) very complicated search strings needed to retrieve a case. I took a few photos from the book; enjoy! (Click on any picture to make it bigger.)

 

 

 

 


#ThrowbackThursday: Civil Litigation Updated 1987

Our last cornerstone conference of the year kicks off tomorrow, so this means our last throwback in 2017 to the conferences from years past. For this year’s “Mont Ste. Trembello” (Mont Ste. Marie + Tremblant + Montebello), I’ve pulled up the agenda from 1987. As a special treat, we also have a copy of the registration form (a nerdy attention to detail that maybe only I enjoy, but I’ve included for you regardless).

 


#ThrowbackThursday: Happy Birthday, CBC! 2

I can’t be the only person who sees reference to an old piece of legislation and then wants to look it up for themselves. When I saw today’s date – November 2 – listed as parliament passing the Canadian Broadcasting Act, I immediately jumped over to HeinOnline to look at the statute from the source law. I was disappointed to see that this information was a bit misleading – The Canadian Broadcasting Act, 1936 was assented to in June 1936.

Page one of SC 1936 c. 24. (If you’d like a copy of the whole act, let us know!)

The CBC did, however, go live to air on November 2, 1936, replacing its predecessor the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission (which itself replaced CNR Radio). Two days after, on November 4, a formal welcome was given by CBC Chairman Leonard Brockington – you can listen to this 15 minute clip on the CBC Archives.